Edinburgh Summer, you are such a tease.

Edinburgh Expeditions

I’ve always been the sort of person to prefer cold weather to hot. As my fellow New Hampshirites complain about the snow, the wind, and the negative temperatures, I laugh and damn the summer. I would rather be cold than too warm–putting on another jumper, hobo gloves and wrapping up in a blanket with a cuppa and a good book is my idea of the perfect relaxing winter’s day.

Notice that I said “winter.”

Edinburgh’s summers are apparently very short. Like, a week in May. Absolutely gorgeous weather, then nothing but rain and cold. I’ve been very happy that I haven’t packed away my jumpers, and that I didn’t listen to my mother and continue to wear my winter boots.

Yesterday, the first day of summer, was cold. I wore jeans, sheepskin lined slippers, drank hot tea, reorganized my workspace. Which, believe you me, was a lot more work than I initially anticipated.

I return from my digression. I’ve never been one to complain about the cold–until now. I don’t want weather to be too warm, but I would like to wear my dresses. And maybe, just maybe, my sandals. And my new sunglasses. So my reasons for disliking the cold are vain.

It isn’t just that. It’s the rain that keeps you from wanting to venture out, that keeps me from going to the library (as in this weather, I’d rather be cold in my own home, where I can get as much tea as my heart desires, thanks very much). Even trips to the neighborhood Tesco become daunting affairs. “I ventured out to do the laundry, that’s enough,” I said.

Though, I’m pretty fortunate compared to New England. Temperatures in the high 90s to low 100s? No thank you. I’d rather freeze.

On temperature and weather

The Twirl and Swirl of Letters

We get that it’s cold. Or that it’s hot. Or whatever.

But there can be more description to the weather in books over that. Bitingly cold. Sweltering heat. Boring, dull, cliche phrases.

Today’s assignment: come up with something more interesting to describe what it’s like where you live.

The day reminds me of England. Temperature wise, it isn’t that cold, perhaps 40 or 50. But it’s the damp that gets you. That creeping, gloomy damp that seeps into your knuckles and makes them ache. No amount of polar fleece can keep you warm. You shiver, huddling in a blanket, and wonder when it’s time to go to bed. Tea is the beverage of choice, as it alone can warm your core.